Are H1B Visa Workers Paid Less Than Similarly Employed Americans?

My input on the H-1B/Tech as I experienced it.. FYI

Following are some key significant points in the history of the tech industry and its development to what it is today as I personally experienced it.

First: Starting with The breakup of the Bell System that was mandated on January 8, 1982, all the top-tier Tech-based Fortune 500 IT Sectors began to rebel and Win – with support of “The Suits” higher up – a key significant victory over the “choke-holding” Corporate HR Kingdom. For the very first time historically HR lost out to an outside corporate sector as to who does the hiring and who does the firing, who designs and writes the job Req’s, sets compensation packages, when, where, why, and how! That means that for the first time in twentieth-century Tech History CTOs, COOs, CSOs, and their ‘downstream’ Managers and Directors essentially became a Co-equal Division of the Corporation. Org charts had to be completely redrawn, core competencies and responsibilities had to be designated and defined and the corporation itself could not make a move when it came to anything Tech without consulting – at the board of directors level – the IT Departments on all project planning, design and implementation. IT had a significant seat at the table in the boardroom.

Great for the corporation not so much for the employees of which there were fewer and fewer. The vast majority of workers hired after these times, more and more as time went by, were contract workers. You literally had to be taken under a wing of a higher-up Boss that knew you, liked you and trusted you to get employee status. Enter the era of the high-paid, exempt status contractor. Employees became as rare as hen’s teeth.

Second: By the year 2000 I found myself unable to get a job that lasted longer than one year animals impossible to get hired on as a permanent employee. In every waiting room for an interview I would be the only guy who is America for this one particular job just one job the other three or four guys were Indians. Needless to say I walked out the most of those interviews and never got a call back although my experience in the trenches was well over 18 years and climbing these guys just got out of school with their degree and the managers and directors we’re impressed by their degrees and the fact that they can manipulate their employment in ways that they couldn’t manipulate mine so I got a stout four years to H1Bs.

Oh.. And by the way I was asking market rate for these positions which was between $45/$55 an hour and they still decided to pay these guys more than that because they had a degree has some managers actually told me to my face! “If you just had a degree or professional certificate I would have hired you but this guy’s got a degree AND a Certificate”. To which I responded yeah and 6 weeks experience in the field – good luck with that one. often I would find out later through friends and Associates that these guys got the $55 an hour rate and a two-year contract where I would have only got the $45 an hour rate and one year contract!

so in my personal experience between about 1998 and early 2000s the H1Bs we’re getting superior pay taking all the jobs from the American guys like me with all the experience because they had degrees, would work any hours they were told to I travel anywhere in the USA they were ordered to travel to stay in motels. Thank my lucky stars by arounderstand 2003-4 inexperienced h-1bs fell out of favor for the more experienced American workers who by now not be able to command market-rate wages and working for far less – so we were ripe for the rape.

So my personal experience was that H1Bs we’re making top dollar and taking all the work for at least a good 10-15 year period between 1990-2005, not just in Silicon Valley where I worked most of the time but Nationwide. I mean there was a time when every time I walked into a Google building cafeteria ( they always had the best food) for lunch all I smelled was Curry LOL. So my personal experience is a little bit different then the statistical average I guess.

Mining Awareness +

The results are mixed. In banking and computer science, dependent h1b employers pay much less compared to natives than non-dependent h1b employers, who in fact pay more than natives. In the computer science data, the H1B coefficient is now positive, revealing that dependent employers account for all of the negativity found in the original equation.” (Sperry, 2017, p. 19)

Excerpts from: “Are H1B Visa Workers Paid Less than Similarly Employed Natives? ” by Sperry, Will (34 pages), Haverford College. Department of Economics, 2017:

Abstract

The H1B visa is under scrutiny over fears of Americans losing their jobs or experiencing lower salaries, especially in STEM occupations. Some have suggested that companies prefer the H1B workers because, among other reason, they are paid less than similarly employed Americans. This paper compares the salaries of H1B workers in America with similarly employed native workers in banking, computer science, sciences…

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2 comments

  1. Thanks for this. I’m sorry about your experience. The statistics for non-H1B dependent employers support your experience, based on the graph, which is why I chose that one. I need to make sure that point is clearer. The author seems to have some issues with writing English or was (mis) corrected by his professor, who is Russian, or was tired.

    There are people with IT degrees who lost their jobs too. I think that saying that you needed a degree was just an excuse. If you had a degree they would have blamed your degree and said that you were overqualified. I suspect that some of these people don’t really have degrees. It’s easier for foreigners to fake it. They twist the rules to hire who they intended to hire in the first place. They were using you to say that they interviewed an American citizen. Degree or no degree they had no intention of hiring you, but only the H1Bs. The only question is bribery or nepotism.

    Your experience seems to correlate with various expansions of H1B and immigration-new citizens, that can still be seen in government statistics, and could be used as a take-off point for further research. 1990 and 2000 are both peaks. It is also supported by the current US median income of people born in India which is $100,000 per year, which is more than double the median for the entire population. I believe that a combination of bribery and nepotism is and was at work. Now, the ones who stole your job are probably the ones running H1B dependent operations. I bet the upper castes stole your job, and then they are hiring lower caste ones for lower pay.

    I believe your experience is widespread but could only find that paper for re-use under creative commons. Not enough research because immigrants started taking over academia in the 1960s and it’s sped up, too, for some decades. Copyright is also an issue even if I find anything, apart from government info. It’s less and less politically correct for the gov to gather useful info. I make do with what I can find to use and in the context of time constraints. Immigration policy has cost American academics, including me and my father, their jobs and made degrees worth less than the paper that they are written on. No one talked about it until it hit IT. Apparently they were slow talking about it in the IT sector, too. The next big scandal should be about the buying of academic jobs. Much of the buying is with grant monies, but I am certain that some rich people are endowing academic positions for their kids. It could be that the parents of these IT-H1B immigrants were endowing their positions to give them a toe-hold in the country – I guess that falls under bribery in such a context.

    I still suspect that Kris Singh of Holtec nuclear doesn’t really have a degree or not undergrad. Once he got to the US, he may have been let through by pretending he was returning to India; professors too embarrassed to admit they couldn’t understand him; emperor with no clothes effect (at higher levels not even the entire committee may understand the topic); and or bribery. Also, there’s been a bizarre belief that people from India and China are smarter. If they are so smart, then why are their countries so messed up?

    India’s top university is ranked around 200th in the world, around that of an average US state university. Singh brought in an IT person on H1B to work at Holtec from a university ranked 3000th in the world – yes, three thousandth. How much longer will Americans buy the lie that we are all big dummies who have to hand over our jobs to “smart” immigrants? With three grad degrees, I’ve been tired of being dissed for awhile, now. When I was a grad student in France, I could answer a question that not one other of the 50 students (from France and Latin America) could answer. The professor was really mad that I could answer it and they couldn’t. I don’t buy that I’m so dumb anymore compared to everyone else. I think that humans, in general, are just not so bright. By now, however, it’s really too late, I think. If we aren’t outnumbered, we are close to it. 20% of Americans were born abroad or a minor living in the household of someone born abroad. That was in 2010. I suspect that those who were not born abroad or whose parents were not born abroad are now in the minority. Most of my ancestors came before the revolutionary war. The exceptions came during the Irish potato famine, over 170 years ago.

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    • I know better – but I started a quick reply to your comments in the wp editor – I made a wrong Mouse move and lost the whole thing so what it said basically was thank you for your response and you were right on on every paragraph. So let me unpack all your insights and I’ll look forward to a full response in another day or two I’m sitting back sippin’ Lagavulin Single Malt, it’s the end of a long day and I should to go to bed. Thank you very much and good night. I’m enjoying this conversation hopefully there’s more to come from both of us tomorrow.

      Liked by 1 person

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