Coup d’etat in Bolivia

Agriculture, forestry and natural gas are the primary drivers of the Bolivian economy. The BOB, Bolivian Boliviano currency is at around 7 BOB to $1 USD. My real interest in Bolivia is ancient Megolithic Ruins in the Lake Titicaca area at the Peruvian border; Tiwanaku and Puma Punku are the dominant sites in Norther Bolivia but there are other lesser known ruins in the north of Bolivia as well. Bolivia is unique to other countries in S.A. – I recommend the country to those who visit S.A. the people are colorful and will welcome you during your visit. La Paz is one of the most beautiful cities in the world IMO!

Bolivia celebrates August 6 as their Independence Day (declared in 1825) and the country is named after Simón José Antonio de la Santísima Trinidad Bolívar – who was actually Venezuelan born in Caracas.

BOLIVIA – A STATE OF CRISIS TODAY

Bolivia is in a state of political crisis after longtime President Evo Morales resigned Sunday following what he described as a military coup. Weeks of protests have taken place since a disputed election last month. Morales announced his resignation in a televised address Sunday, shortly after the Bolivian military took to the airwaves to call for his resignation. Bolivia’s vice president also resigned Sunday, as did the head of the Bolivian Senate and the lower house.

Opposition leader Jeanine Áñez, who is the second vice president of the Bolivian Senate, is claiming she will assume the presidency today. Evo Morales was the longest-serving president in Latin America, as well as Bolivia’s first indigenous leader. He was credited with lifting nearly a fifth of Bolivia’s population out of poverty since he took office in 2006, but he faced mounting criticism from some of his former supporters for running for a third and then a fourth term. For more on the unfolding crisis in Bolivia, we speak with Mark Weisbrot, co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research.

His latest piece for The Nation is headlined “The Trump Administration Is Undercutting Democracy in Bolivia.” “This is a military coup — there’s no doubt about it now,” Weisbrot says.

https://www.democracynow.org/2019/11/11/evo_morales_bolivia_protests_military_coup?utm_source=Democracy+Now%21&utm_campaign=0c6e695b53-Daily_Digest_COPY_02&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_fa2346a853-0c6e695b53-191727029

2 comments

  1. Thanks also for those referrals – Telesur I visited but didn’t especially care for their angles, Deutsche Welle I never visited but will do so after this week (I’m exhausted from those hearings and after-hearing ‘talking head’ analysis). I like Al Jazeera too and DemocracyNow is hit and miss these days – their stories are always about ‘real’ issues riding under the radar but not always in my Arena.. much appreciated guys!

  2. I wanted to see how German Government Deutsche Welle covered Bolivia and fell upon this from Nov 4th: https://www.dw.com/en/bolivia-scraps-joint-lithium-project-with-german-company/a-51100873
    I realized you probably mean free news on Latin America crisis now and normally I would say Canadian Broadcasting (CBC), and I do think they have remained fairly neutral on a lot of things, considering that Canada has lots and lots of Latin Am mining companies. Then there is BBC. And, Deutsche Welle. France24 (which I really have never watched because I speak French). There is, of course, Telesur, but not exactly neutral. I liked Al Jazeera’s coverage. But, you can read between the lines, especially if you look up the investments. I always appreciated Amy Goodman’s coverage of Aristide and Haiti, but disagree with her opinions/focus more and more on most things. But, she is good on some things. Still the best is to read small local online publications and things like that in Spanish. You can use google translate to test and train your reading, or if you are tired.

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